Education Opportunity Network

Education Opportunity Network -

4/28/2016 – How School Vouchers Promote Religious Schools And Hurt Education

THIS WEEK: NAEP Results Disappoint … Online Schools Stink … Does Money Matter? … Race And Testing … Student Protests Rise

TOP STORY

How School Vouchers Promote Religious Schools And Hurt Education

By Jeff Bryant

“Due to school voucher programs, in all their forms, ‘religious schools actually are receiving large amounts of government money’ … That means public tax dollars are funding religion based curriculum … Voucher proponents claim all of this is fine because parents have ‘made the choice.’ But shouldn’t we have a choice about whether or not we fund this?”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

Low Performers Show Big Declines On 12th Grade NAEP Test

Education Week

“Much like their 4th and 8th grade peers, high school seniors have lost ground in math over the last two years, according to the most recent scores on a national achievement test. In reading, 12th grade scores remained flat, continuing a trend since 2009.”
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National Education Policy Center Report Urges Stopping The Expansion Of Virtual Schools

Ed Surge

“Large, for-profit providers dominate the virtual school market … ‘The school performance measures for both virtual and blended schools indicate that these schools are not as successful as traditional public schools. Nevertheless, the evidence suggests that their enrollment growth has continued’ … Policymakers [should] halt the growth of virtual and blended schools until researchers have found a reason for students’ poor performance and ways to correct it.”
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Can More Money Fix America’s Schools?

NPR

“While the money in Camden, N.J., has led to relatively little academic progress … North Carolina, Indiana and Massachusetts offer a compelling counterpoint to the idea that money doesn’t really matter. So, too, do a pair of recent studies … Money can make a difference in the classroom. If … The money reaches students who need it most … The increases come steadily, year after year … The money stays in the classroom.”
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Race And The Standardized Testing Wars

The New York Times

“As testing season unfolds this year … more minority educators, parents and students are criticizing the tests, opening a rift with civil rights groups … The battle lines are clearly shifting … Because testing provides an incomplete picture of the problems at low-performing schools, it can lead to policies that worsen those problems rather than ameliorate them.”
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The Protest Generation Wants Its Education Back

The Progressive

Jeff Bryant writes, “A wave of protest actions going on in the Tarheel State … is indicative of a national-level fight for education justice and civil rights throughout all of public education … At a time when public education is increasingly being operated as a business-oriented, market driven enterprise, and democratic input into the system is being treated as a nuisance, students themselves are more disenchanted and are demanding a say in their education destinies.”
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4/21/2016 – We Won’t Improve Education By Making Teachers Hate Their Jobs

THIS WEEK: New Majority Will Reshape Education … Decaying Schools Hurt Kids … Immigrant Students Blocked … Charters Cashing In On Kids … State Takeovers Steal Democracy

TOP STORY

We Won’t Improve Education By Making Teachers Hate Their Jobs

By Jeff Bryant

“One likely outcome of the high work dissatisfaction rate among teachers is that many states and school districts are now reporting acute teacher shortages … There are factors other than economics that are making teachers’ work-lives miserable … A new survey survey finds 83% of respondents said the inclusion of student standardized test scores in teacher evaluations has had a negative impact.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

Racially Diverse ‘New Majority’ Set To Reshape Us Public Schools

The Christian Science Monitor

“Since 2014, for the first time in the country’s history, a majority of those in public schools have been students of color … What’s their emerging message? In part it’s in keeping with the age-old desires of families everywhere: a good education in safe schools. But it’s also a call for greater equity in school quality … And for some … shaping lessons that truly embrace diversity … The call for better schools and greater equity comes at an important moment in national education policy.”
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Decaying School Buildings Have Physical, Psychological Consequences

Education Dive

“Research links children’s ability to learn to the condition of their school environment. That means that the deteriorating condition of school buildings should be more relevant in ongoing discussions about closing achievement gaps … Building decay also impacts the quality of teachers’ instruction, playing a role in their confidence and general wellbeing … Attention must be paid to the physical condition of schools – and that means boosting state or federal funding for much-needed repairs.”
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Report: Immigrant Students Blocked From Enrolling In School

Associated Press

“Immigrant children living in the US without legal status have been blocked from registering for school and accessing the educational services … Students have faced long enrollment delays and have been turned away from classrooms as the result of some districts’ arbitrary interpretations of residency rules and state laws … The Obama administration’s efforts to find and deport the tens of thousands of unaccompanied Central American children and families … have further complicated the situation, prompting some students to avoid school.”
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Agassi’s Fund Cashes In On N. Phila. Charter-School Venture

The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Former tennis pro Andre Agassi’s charter-school investment fund is poised to turn a $1 million profit when it sells a North Philadelphia classroom building this week to the charter operator that has leased it for five years … The sale to KIPP Philadelphia Charter School is one of the first by Agassi’s partnership with the California-based financier Bobby Turner since they set out in 2011 … The deal sheds light on a growing niche in real estate … ‘If you want to treat a problem, then philanthropy is fine,’ Turner said. ‘But if you want to cure, really cure, you’ve got to harness market forces to create sustainable solutions that are scalable. And that means making money.'”
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School District Takeovers: Bad For Students, Bad For Democracy

Schott Foundation For Public Education

John Jackson, President and CEO Schott Foundation For Public Education writes, “in many states and cities there are counterproductive disenfranchisement actions being taken that disempower Black and Latino communities – the takeover of their public schools … Denying these citizens’ right to elect local school boards through state takeovers or mayoral control should sound the same alarm as denying them the vote … Takeover actions taken without the appropriate democratic test being applied and without the state first meeting its constitutional support obligation creates a slippery slope that diminishes our democracy, weakens the role of public schools in communities, and produces poor outcomes for our students.”
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4/14/2016 – The Flint Effect: Will One City’s Crisis Spark A National Awakening?

THIS WEEK: The Trump Effect … Parents See Racial Disparities … School Closures Don’t Work … Childcare Is A Right … College Loans Not Getting Paid

TOP STORY

The Flint Effect: Will One City’s Crisis Spark A National Awakening?

By Jeff Bryant

“While Katrina was a singular event with a tragically long legacy, Flint is proving to be the beginning of a story playing out over a much longer time period and in more than one place … Flint prompted school officials in many places to test classroom sinks and cafeteria faucets for lead. What they found was alarming.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

Donald Trump’s Rhetoric Has Made Some Students Feel Unsafe, Report Says

Education Week

“The 2016 presidential election’s heated rhetoric and divisive policy proposals have had a negative effect on school climate, causing some students to feel unwelcome, unsafe, or singled out by their peers … [Survey]respondents overwhelmingly singled out billionaire businessman and Republican frontrunner Donald J. Trump as the most problematic … More than two-thirds of the teachers reported that students – mainly immigrants, children of immigrants, and Muslims – have expressed concerns or fears about what might happen to them or their families.”
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Some Parents Of Color Don’t Think Schools Are Even Trying To Educate Their Children

The Washington Post

“Over 80% of African-American parents and over 60% of Latino parents said that they don’t think schools in their communities receive the same levels of funding as schools in white communities … An overwhelming number of parents from both groups said they think schools in low-income communities have fewer resources than schools in wealthy communities … In general, most surveyed black parents said they do not think kids from their communities are receiving a comparable education to the one white students receive, even though they have generally favorable opinions of the individual schools their children attend.”
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School Closures: A Blunt Instrument

American Prospect

“In urban districts across the United States – from Detroit to Newark to Oakland – communities are experiencing waves of controversial school closures as cash-strapped districts reckon with pinched budgets and changing politics … African Americans have been hit hardest by the school closings … A majority of closed schools are converted into charter schools.”
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The $90 Billion Question: Do We Need Government-Supplied Daycare?

The Washington Post

“Researchers at the Economic Policy Institute, a think tank in the District, say … America should invest more resources into building a national childcare system, one that rewards quality … The EPI authors recommend … expanding public funding for home visits by nurses to help expectant parents make healthy choices during pregnancy and adding subsidies for those who can’t afford high quality care … They also campaign for the public provision of early childhood education that focuses on cognitive development, so kids with different family incomes, can enter school at more equal levels of preparedness.”
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More Than 40% Of Student Borrowers Aren’t Making Payments

The Wall Street Journal

43% of the roughly 22 million Americans with federal student loans weren’t making payments … About 1 in 6 borrowers, or 3.6 million, were in default on $56 billion in student debt, meaning they had gone at least a year without making a payment. Three million more owing roughly $66 billion were at least a month behind … Another three million owing almost $110 billion were in ‘forbearance’ or ‘deferment,’ meaning they had received permission to temporarily halt payments due to a financial emergency, such as unemployment. The figures exclude borrowers still in school and those with government-guaranteed private loans.”
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4/7/2016 – Why The Panama Papers Scandal Is About Cheating School Children

THIS WEEK: Pre-K Closes Achievement Gaps … A Teacher’s Race Matters … Fewer Poor Students Are In College … Teacher Shortages Continue … Testing Flaws

TOP STORY

Why The Panama Papers Scandal Is About Cheating School Children

By Jeff Bryant

“Leaked documents, called the Panama Papers, show the myriad ways in which wealthy people …. exploit offshore havens to avoid paying taxes … But much of the reporting about the Panama Papers overlooks two critically important contexts … Tax avoidance at a much smaller scale is actually quite commonplace right where you live … The effects of tax avoidance, in all its forms, are actually most consequential on the individual lives of the least powerful.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

The Policy That Could All But Eliminate Achievement Gaps Between Rich And Poor Students

The Huffington Post

“Low-income students could gain more than five months of additional reading skills by attending a high-quality preschool, according to the analysis, which would reduce their learning gap by 41%. Black children could nearly close their achievement gap in reading by gaining nearly seven months of learning, and Hispanic children could completely catch up to white students in reading skills before kindergarten. Results [are] similar for math.”
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White Teachers And Black Teachers Have Different Expectations For Black Students

The Washington Post

“When a white (or other non-black) teacher and a black teacher evaluate the same black student, the study found, the white teacher is 30% less likely to believe that the student will graduate from a four-year college – and 40% less likely to believe the student will graduate from high school. The discrepancy [is] even greater for black male students … Race affects how teachers see and treat their students.”
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Fewer Poor Students Are Being Enrolled In State Universities. Here’s Why

The Conversation

“In the face of increasingly tight budgets and pressures to demonstrate their effectiveness to legislators, more and more states are tying at least some higher education funding to student outcomes … Such funding policies … may be reducing access for low-income students at public colleges … States should consider placing provisions in both their enrollment-based and performance-based funding systems to encourage colleges to continuing to enroll an economically diverse student body.”
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Teacher Shortages Continue Nationwide

AMI News

“The nation continues to weather a shortage of qualified teachers … Most troubling in this job market is the dearth of math, science and technology teachers … While teaching is seen as a stable career by some and as a high calling by many, education schools have weathered the perception that jobs are typically low-paying and conditions are tough. Retention is also a huge and costly issue … In 2012-2013, 7.7% of teachers left the profession … up from 5.6% in 1988-1989.”
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The Fatal Flaw of Educational Assessment

Education Week

Renowned education assessment expert James Popham writes, “We currently use the wrong tests to make our most important educational decisions … Most policymakers, and almost all parents of school-age children do not realize how these tests contribute to diminished educational quality … Comparison-focused educational tests … [have] completely dominated America’s educational testing for almost a century … However, tests built chiefly for comparisons are not suitable for purposes of instruction or evaluation of instructional quality in education. These tests provide teachers with few instructional insights and typically lead to inaccurate evaluations of a teacher’s instructional quality.”
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3/31/2016 – Is Education Being Measured To Death?

THIS WEEK: Friedrichs Is Dead … School Climate Matters … Not Enough School Nurses … Teachers Priced Out Of Houses … College As A Commodity

TOP STORY

Is Education Being Measured To Death?

By Jeff Bryant

“April ushers in the beginning of testing season in public schools across the nation… but many students and parents appear to be anything but happy about that … The tests don’t serve purposes that are as clear and reasonable as their advocates would have us believe.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

The Biggest Legal Attack On Unions In Decades Is Dead

Think Progress

“The Supreme Court announced … Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association is dead … Friedrichs was an attack on what are alternatively called ‘agency fees’ or ‘fair share fees’ … With the Court split 4-4, Friedrichs will have no effect and the Court’s previous precedents permitting agency fees will remain good law, binding on all lower court judges.”
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School Conditions Matter For Student Achievement, New Research Confirms

Chalkbeat New York

“A new study on New York City schools … found that significant gains in key measures of a school’s climate, like safety and academic expectations, can be linked to the equivalent of an extra month and a half of math instruction and, in some cases, a 25 percent reduction in teacher turnover.”
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Many School Districts Don’t Have Enough School Nurses

US News & World Report

“Less than half of the country’s public schools employ a full-time nurse, and in some of the worst cases – largely in poor, urban school systems – there’s only one school nurse for every 4,000 students …. The scarcity of nurses comes amid an all-time high in the incidence of childhood chronic illnesses – things like asthma, food allergies, diabetes, obesity and epilepsy.”
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More Teachers Can’t Afford To Live Where They Teach

NPR

“In high cost cities, teachers and their unions are increasingly making cost-of-living adjustments central to contract talks … Scores of cities have added affordable-housing quotas to rules on new development. Some are debating building subsidized condos or apartments specifically for teachers … The hope is that the moves will help stem a teacher turnover crisis.”
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The Commodification Of Higher Education

The Atlantic

“rankings have helped shape a world in which students are seen as consumers, and colleges and universities as commodities. The rankings are a key reason the higher-education landscape today operates like a marketplace in which institutions compete to convince the best students to buy their product … The larger the applicant pool is in relation to the student body, the more selective the school appears in those rankings … The temptation to dole out more merit aid traces back to the rankings, which incentivize colleges to try and enroll top-notch applicants.”
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3/24/2016 – How Breaking Government Hurts Children

THIS WEEK: Who Is DFER? … Charter Schools Suspensions … High School Protests … School Immigrant Influx … Walmart Schools

TOP STORY

How Breaking Government Hurts Children

By Jeff Bryant

“New reports reveal that years of hating government are taking their toll on the nation’s infrastructure, in particular, those government services, such as safe drinking water and public schools, which are essential to children.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

How DFER Leaders Channel Out-Of-State Dark Money In California, Colorado, and Beyond

The Center For Media And Democracy

“At first glance, ‘Democrats for Education Reform’ (DFER) may sound like a generic advocacy group, but a closer review of its financial filings and activities shows how it uses local branding to help throw the voice of huge Wall Street players and other corporate interests from out-of-state … DFER has targeted more than a dozen states.”
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Charter Schools Propping Up The School-To-Prison Pipeline

USA Today

“Charter schools suspend students at a much higher rate than non-charter schools, some of which have suspension rates north of 70 percent. But a disproportionate amount of those suspensions fall on black students, who are four times more likely to be suspended than white students, and students with disabilities, who are twice as likely to be suspended as their non-disabled peers.”
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In Activist Era, High-Schoolers From Boston To Detroit Take To Streets

The Christian Science Monitor

“The emerging student activism movement is incredibly broad, incredibly diverse, and it’s been sparked by this newfound sense of empowerment that comes from social media [and] the ability to make your voice heard in areas where traditionally that hasn’t been possible.”
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Immigrant Influxes Put U.S. Schools To The Test

Education Week

“The United States is now home to the largest number of foreign-born black people in its history – and many are K-12 students enrolled in public schools … Districts have had to adjust on the fly to meet the needs of students who arrive communicating in less frequently spoken languages such as Amharic, Haitian Creole, and Somali.”
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How The Cutthroat Walmart Business Model Is Reshaping American Public Education

Alternet

Jeff Bryant reports, “At the same time news of Walmart store closings spread through local media outlets, the Walton Family Foundation (WFF), the private foundation created with the retail giant’s wealth, announced that it would be ‘doubling down on its investments in school choice with a $1 billion plan to help expand the charter school sector’ … More communities may have to contend with the reality of schools, public or charter, coming and going based on forces not in their control.”
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3/17/2016 – Don’t Blame Bernie; Most People Don’t Get Charter Schools

THIS WEEK: Teaching Trump … Inequity Causes Dropouts … Sweden’s Education Catastrophe … University Hedge Funds … College Loan Corruption

TOP STORY

Don’t Blame Bernie; Most People Don’t Get Charter Schools

By Jeff Bryant

“When Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders fielded a question about charter schools at a Democratic Party presidential primary town hall, his answer left a lot of folks scratching their heads … There is … widespread confusion about charter schools … Charter schools are not private schools. But because of the ways in which they are privately controlled, they aren’t really public either.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

The Parent-Child Discussion That So Many Dread: Donald Trump

The New York Times

“For some children, Mr. Trump’s message has filtered down in extremely upsetting, possibly dangerous, ways. Social media has buzzed with parents relaying their children’s fears that they or their friends will be deported, walled in or walled out if Mr. Trump becomes president … As much as they might want to, parents and educators cannot keep their children insulated from news about Mr. Trump.”
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Researchers Link Inequality To High School Dropout Rates

The Christian Science Monitor

“A new paper… debunks the common economic conception that inequality inspires those in the lower-income brackets to try harder in achieving upward mobility … Low-income youths who are exposed to considerable socioeconomic gaps are likely to view middle-class life as unattainable, resulting in a detachment from their futures.”
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‘It’s A Political Failure’: How Sweden’s Celebrated Schools System Fell Into Crisis

The Guardian

“Sweden, once regarded as a byword for high-quality education … has seen not only have scores in international tests gone down, inequality in the Swedish system has gone up … Sweden’s decline follows a raft of changes in the late 1980s and early 1990s that transformed the educational landscape … A voucher system was introduced giving parents the power to choose which school to send their child to. Each child was funded by the state, and if the child chose to go do a different school, the money would follow.”
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Universities Are Becoming Billion-Dollar Hedge Funds With Schools Attached

The Nation

“Over $100 billion of educational endowment money nationwide is invested in hedge funds, costing them approximately $2.5 billion in fees in 2015 alone. The problems with hedge funds managing college endowments are manifold, going well beyond the exorbitant – some would say extortionate – fees they charge for their services.”
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Elizabeth Warren’s Latest Challenge To College Loan Corruption

Campaign For America’s Future

Jeff Bryant reports, “Turning higher education into a high-stakes gamble propped up with historic levels of individual debt has increased the chance of hucksters like [Donald] Trump to ply their trade. But his scheme to swindle well-intentioned students is really a deft attempt at stretching the limits of a game whose rules and goals need to be challenged. Someone is taking on that challenge… Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.”
Read more …

3/10/2016 – The Urgent Education Issue That Needs To Be In The Presidential Debates

THIS WEEK: Community Schools Are Key … School Integration Progress … Common Core Fail … ALEC’s Education Bills … Too Many College CEOs

TOP STORY

The Urgent Education Issue That Needs To Be In The Presidential Debates

By Jeff Bryant

“Numerous observers have noticed K-12 education has finally gotten some meaningful attention in the presidential primary debate … Hearing how our potential leaders might take on the real crisis at hand – the inadequacy of how our education system is funded – might take the whole nation closer in a direction toward more meaningful change.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

Why Community Schools Are The Key To Our Future

Medium

“While poor schools have taken many paths to transform themselves into successful schools, one particular path has worked again and again. There are 5.1 million children enrolled in approximately 5,000 community schools in the United States, and those numbers are growing quickly … While there is a fair amount of variability within schools that have implemented this strategy, thousands of schools have gotten it just right.”
Read more …

Is School Integration Finally Making The Grade?

New America Foundation

“Aside from President Obama’s proposal to more than double federal spending on school integration efforts … socioeconomic integration of schools is already taking place in … 91 districts and charter networks in 32 states that use socioeconomic status as a factor in student assignment. This represents a significant increase in the last twenty years … over four million students, about eight percent of all public school students.”
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Academic Expectations Around The Country, Updated For Common Core

Hechinger Report

“Common Core … backers hoped that all states would insist that their students learn enough to be prepared for college when they graduated from high school. But a recent analysis … after the adoption of the Common Core, shows that most states are still not expecting their students to be on a college-ready trajectory … Academic expectations continue to differ even among the 45 states that adopted the new standards.”
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Cashing In On Kids: 172 ALEC Education Bills Push Privatization In 2015

The Center For Media And Democracy

“ALEC has cooked up a variety of means of gaining ground on school privatization … A handful of ALEC bills claim to offer ‘scholarships’ … but are actually targeted voucher programs … ALEC and its allies have additionally sought to move away from the term ‘vouchers’ and towards ‘education savings accounts.'”
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Universities Run Into Problems When They Hire Presidents From The Business World

Think Progress

“An increasing number of university presidents with business backgrounds are coming into colleges with the idea to reform them and make them more marketable, more desirable, and, in turn, more profitable. But the problem is that they often have little to no experience in academia – and may see education as something that serves the university’s financial needs rather than something that should serve students’ and professors’ needs … Universities have very different cultures and hierarchies than corporations, yet there is a belief that corporate management goals can easily be applied to schools, while no one would expect the reverse.”
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3/3/2016 – Positive Aura Of Charter Schools Wearing Thin

THIS WEEK: Concentrated Poverty In Schools … ADHD Linked To Adult Expectations … More Money For Pre-K … New Teacher Evaluations Fail … Who’s Regulating For-Profit Colleges?

TOP STORY

The Positive Aura Of Charter Schools Is Wearing Thin

By Jeff Bryant

“A new survey of voters across the country reveals growing concerns about charter schools. The poll … found the public … generally opposes expansion of charters. Huge majorities in the poll expressed strong support for a wide range of charter schools reforms that the industry often opposes.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

The Concentration Of Poverty In American Schools

The Atlantic

“In almost all major American cities, most African American and Hispanic students attend public schools where a majority of their classmates qualify as poor or low-income … Researchers have found that the single-most powerful predictor of racial gaps in educational achievement is the extent to which students attend schools surrounded by other low-income students.”
Read more …

Could Adults’ Expectations Drive Up ADHD Diagnoses in Kids?

Health Day

“Rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have risen globally, and adults’ unreasonable expectations of young children could be one reason why, researchers suggest … Between 1981 and 1997, U.S. children dedicated more and more hours per week to studying. The biggest change was seen among 6- to 8-year-olds.”
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Nationwide Bipartisan Trend: State Pre-K Funding Increases

New America Foundation

“Almost two-thirds of states plus the District of Columbia funded pre-K at higher levels last year than the year prior … The spending trend on pre-K among states reflects a positive shift in national attitudes towards the value of early education.”
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Very Few Teachers Receive Poor Job Ratings, And New Evaluations Haven’t Changed That

The Washington Post

“Are the new evaluations – many of which incorporate test scores or other measures of student learning – any better at identifying poor teaching? Not really … The median proportion of teachers deemed below proficient has ticked up from less than 1 percent to less than 3 percent.”
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Who’s Regulating For-Profit Schools? Execs From For-Profit Colleges

ProPublica

“College accreditors have come under scrutiny recently for allowing for-profit schools to collect billions in federal aid despite low graduation and high default rates. Accreditors are supposed to be watchdogs for college quality… So who are the people behind the beleaguered accreditor? … Two-thirds of them have worked as executives at for-profit schools while sitting on the council. A third of the commissioners came from schools that have been facing consumer-protection lawsuits, investigations by state attorneys general, or federal financial monitoring.”
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2/25/2016 – The Education ‘Reform’ Bargain Is Off. What’s Needed Instead.

THIS WEEK: Money Matters … Education As Equalizer? … Why Replicate Findland … Student Activism Works … Climate Change Taught Wrong

TOP STORY

The Education ‘Reform’ Bargain Is Off. Here’s What We Need Instead.

By Jeff Bryant

“Because the original bargain of education reform was broken at the outset, let’s free the conversation of the constraints of that deal and instead consider what we can do to support equity. That’s what a real conversation about education policy would be all about.”
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NEWS AND VIEWS

How Do You Fix Schools? Maybe Just Give Them More Money.

Slate

“What if simply throwing more money at schools actually is a reasonable approach? A couple of interesting recent studies suggest it might be … This new wavelet of research should at the very least weaken the by-now-conventional wisdom that cash alone can’t ease the problems that ail our education system. Maybe money is a solution, after all.”
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Still Think America Is The ‘Land Of Opportunity’? Look At This Chart.

The Washington Post

“Policymakers on the left and right often tout education as the bridge to help poor kids make their way up the income ladder … But striking new research from the Brookings Institution shows that simply sending more kids to college won’t fix income inequality: As it turns out, a college degree is worth a lot less, earnings-wise, to poor kids than to rich ones.”
Read more …

How Finland Broke Every Rule – And Created A Top School System

The Hechinger Report

“Finland’s historic achievements in delivering educational excellence and equity to its children are the result of a national love of childhood, a profound respect for teachers as trusted professionals, and a deep understanding of how children learn best … What if many of Finland’s educational practices are not cultural quirks or non-replicable national idiosyncrasies – but are instead bare-minimum global best practices that all our children urgently need, especially those children in high-poverty schools?”
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High School Student Activism Makes An Impact

Education Week

“Student walk-outs and boycotts have been effective in generating attention for a number of issues around the country … What’s remarkable and inspiring is that at a young age our teens can also be thoughtful, informed, passionate, and right.”
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Why Science Teachers Are Struggling With Climate Change

NPR

“Many middle and high school science teachers are getting climate change wrong … Roughly 30 percent tell students that humans are only partly to blame for climate change, along with natural causes.”
Read more …